Lamar Wilson, 23. (Johnson County Sheriff)

Wilson to use Iowa’s new ‘stand your ground’ defense in Ped Mall shooting trial

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Lamar Wilson has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder.

By Kayli Reese
kayli-reese@uiowa.edu

The Iowa City man accused of murder in the Pedestrian Mall shooting will use the “stand your ground” defense in his trial.

Lamar Wilson, 23, 2220 Arizona St., faces charges of first-degree murder, two counts of attempted murder, and three counts of intimidation with a dangerous weapon.

The Ped Mall shooting occurred Aug. 27 near the Sheraton Hotel and resulted in the death of Iowa City resident Kaleek Jones. Two other people were taken to the hospital.

The shooting was between two “groups,” one of which is from Iowa City.

RELATED: Father of two dies from injuries sustained from Ped Mall shooting

Court documents obtained by The Daily Iowan said Wilson will use the “stand your ground” defense in his Nov. 7 trial. He also, according to the documents, will claim self-defense, defense of others, defense of property, and defense against a forcible felony.

The documents said Wilson has pleaded not guilty to the charges. After the shooting occurred, officers said Wilson admitted to firing several rounds.

Former Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad signed the stand-your-ground legislation, and it went into effect July 1. The law allows individuals who feel they are in imminent danger to use deadly force against those threatening them.

RELATED: Police say Ped Mall shooting was not a random act

When a defendant uses “stand your ground” as a defense, he or she claims by using deadly force instead of retreating, he or she protected and defended others in attention to themselves.

Court documents said Wilson faces life in prison without parole for first-degree murder, 25 years in prison for each count of attempted murder, and 10 years in prison for each count of intimidation with a dangerous weapon.

Wilson is being held in the Johnson County Jail, the documents said; he has a $1.75 million bond.

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